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Why Did Chevron Support Leticia Perez?

There are four reasons we can think of: AB 32, fracking, Michael Rubio and Democrats run California.

Jun 26, 2013

Local politicos say it's unusual for a company like Chevron to get involved in local politics. There's a farmer backlash at Chevron for its support of Leticia Perez in her run for state assembly against Andy Vidak. Vidak almost won in the primary, and it's safe to say if it hadn't been for Chevron's $250,000 contribution to her campaign, he would have won. So, why did Chevron get involved? There are four reasons we can think of: AB 32, fracking, Michael Rubio and Democrats run California. Perez is a Democrat, Vidak a Republican.

Here's the deal, not necessarily in chronological order: Michael Rubio resigned his senate seat to work for Chevron; Leticia Perez, a former Rubio assistant, resigned her recently won Kern County Supervisor seat to run for the vacant Rubio senate seat; Chevron donates $250,000 to Perez; California legislators lighten up on fracking rules; California legislators make AB 32 very favorable to Chevron.

According to CalWatchdog reporter Katy Grimes the Chevron oil company "could receive AB 32 cap-and-trade revenues...or to put it another way, Chevron could get its own money back." How could this happen? "A new bill would make money from the cap-and-trade fund available to refineries to work to reduce greenhouse gas emissions."

Chevron would also reap a windfall from fracking. On May 29 Claudia Cowen reported for Fox News that standing in the way of fracking "is a flurry of anti-fracking bills. At last count, 10 were on the table, all introduced by Democrats seeking tighter controls over the controversial technology." Just a few days later on June 3 the Daily Caller reported "the California legislature opted not to follow in the footsteps of New Jersey and New York, defeating a bill that would have put a moratorium on fracking within the state until regulations could be imposed."

Can we absolutely say these events are related? No. But, what do you think?



 

State Sen. Michael Rubio resigns to work for Chevron

February 22, 2013|By Patrick McGreevy


State Sen. Michael J. Rubio (D–Shafter) abruptly announced Friday that he is resigning his office to spend more time with his family and accept a government affairs job with Chevron Corp.

The departure of Rubio, who was leading the charge to make California’s environmental laws more business-friendly, creates a third vacancy in the 40-person Senate. Link to story.


 

Greenhouse gas emitter Chevron could get AB 32 funds


By Katy Grimes, Calwatchdog, 6/20/13


A legislative irony came to light Wednesday: The Chevron oil company, loathed by many in the environmental community as a polluter, could receive AB 32 cap-and-trade revenues. Because Chevron is a greenhouse gas “emitter,” a new bill would make money from the cap-and-trade fund available to refineries to work to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.


Or to put it another way, Chevron could get its own money back, but then be forced to pay prevailing wages on jobs they don’t need.


When everything is regulated by government to the point of regulations having regulations, special interests turn on one another, as evidenced by the ramifications of AB 32, California’s Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006. Link to story.

 

California Democrats experience anti-fracking setback


Posted By Michael Bastasch On 11:50 AM 06/03/2013 In Daily Caller News Foundation | No Comments


California Democrats have suffered a setback in their anti-fracking efforts, but will continue to push for more rules on the controversial drilling technique known as hydraulic fracturing.


The California legislature opted not to follow in the footsteps of New Jersey and New York, defeating a bill that would have put a moratorium on fracking within the state until regulations could be imposed.


The oil and gas industry and other fracking proponents point to the considerable economic benefits that fracking could bring to the state.


The Monterey Shale formation is estimated to have 15.4 billion barrels of recoverable oil — two-thirds of the country’s shale oil reserves. A University of Southern California study found that developing the Monterey Shale could generate 2.8 million jobs and $24.6 billion in government revenues by 2020.


This is an exciting prospect for a high-debt state like California. A recent report by the California Public Policy Center put the combined debt of California and local governments at $848 billion — but it could pass $1.1 trillion, according the report. Link to story.


 

California Dems push anti-fracking bills, aim to curb potential oil bonanza


By Claudia Cowan


Published May 29, 2013


FoxNews.com


California is on the verge of a new gold rush. Expanded hydraulic fracturing -- or "fracking" -- at the Monterey Shale formation is sparking estimates that 15 billion barrels of oil could be accessed, along with millions of jobs and huge contributions to the domestic energy supply.


Even the state's green-friendly Democratic governor, Jerry Brown, says "the potential is extraordinary."


But standing in the way is a flurry of anti-fracking bills. At last count, 10 were on the table, all introduced by Democrats seeking tighter controls over the controversial technology.


Some of the measures take aim at how crude is extracted from rock layers beyond the reach of conventional drilling.


But some legislators aren't convinced those regulations will be enough, as energy companies aggressively eye the vast Monterey Shale, and the promise of the biggest boom ever in this oil-rich state.
Link to story.

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