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At Least 1 Democrat 'Gets It'!

“It is ludicrous to demand we develop policies for sustainable groundwater and at the same time take away the single most important recharge element – irrigation water."

Mar 23, 2015

Assemblyman Adam Gray, D-Merced, has introduced a bill that would prohibit the State Water Board from "adopting plans that significantly harm groundwater basins."

To quote the Assemblyman
, “It is ludicrous to demand we develop policies for sustainable groundwater and at the same time take away the single most important recharge element – irrigation water. That the agency responsible for compliance with the new groundwater law would even consider such action in one of our most threatened groundwater basins is mind boggling and offensive to those of us who live there.”

We hope he can drive his point home. Democrats hold a huge majority in the State Assembly. We'll wait and see how many of his collegues he can get to sign on. But, we won't hold our breath. 

Gray introduces bills to reduce impact of drought

Merced Sun-Star
Sun-Star Staff

Assemblyman Adam Gray, D-Merced, has proposed three water bills aimed at reducing the impact of the drought on farmers statewide and stimulating Central Valley agriculture.
 
Assembly Bill 1242 would prohibit the State Water Resources Control Board from adopting plans that significantly harm groundwater basins.
 
For the past year, according to a press release put out by Gray’s office, the board has considered redirecting significantly more water away from agriculture and urban users to allow additional water to flow out to the Delta.
 
In a letter to Gov. Jerry Brown, Gray called the proposal to divert over 350,000 acre-feet of water from the Tuolumne, Stanislaus and Merced river basins unreasonable, according to the press release.
 
“It is ludicrous to demand we develop policies for sustainable groundwater and at the same time take away the single most important recharge element – irrigation water,” Gray said in the release. “That the agency responsible for compliance with the new groundwater law would even consider such action in one of our most threatened groundwater basins is mind boggling and offensive to those of us who live there.”
 
As rivers and streams have dried up due to the lack of rain and snow in the mountains, many users have turned to pumping groundwater to meet their needs, but the drought has also limited the state’s supply of groundwater.
 
According to Gray, another bill, AB 1243, would help local governments and water districts pay to construct systems to put water back into the ground.
 
Gray also introduced AB 1244, which would allow farmers to construct ponds to accommodate water storage.
 
“Farmers on the Russian River watershed are allowed expedited reviews of small ponds and reservoirs,” Gray said. “This bill simply extends that ability to all farmers in the state.”

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